FullSizeRender 2

I Am A Failure And Why I’m Okay With It

Failure is a harsh word.

Harsh but fair.

It’s not as if the word failure isn’t right. I mean, come on, I fail at a lot of things. All kinds of them to be honest.

I fail to complete tasks, to love well, to speak kindly, to be honest with myself and with others. Failure to do the things I want to, and failure to live the life I dream of.

And you know what, I am okay with it all.

Now don’t get me wrong, I would love to live a perfect life, pleasing everyone, and accomplishing great things, but I am okay with my failures.

I think we all have a list of failures miles long, that we write out in our heads, if we let ourselves, but I also think we have our secret list of failures too.

Secret failures that we only know about. The ones written in our hearts, that we look back on every so often, and they are the fog we see ourselves through.

Our secret failures could be a lack of a relationship, the fact that we are not done with school, when it seems everyone else is. Maybe it is that you are not able to get pregnant, and you carry the weight of that silently. You could be one of those people who had a five year plan and here you are in year six with nothing happening as scheduled, so you have labeled yourself a failure.

Through society’s eyes we see and compare ourselves to so many people, real or not, we compare and judge ourselves by their successes. We cast our votes for who is the prettiest, and the most popular. We allow the image that flash across our screen to determine our joy.

We label ourselves failures.

Failures in life.

Love.

Work.

We throw ourselves to the wolves without having any real knowledge of what we are doing it for.

But I am here to say; your life, and my life, are different.

Different isn’t bad, different is just different.

Different from each other.

When we label ourselves as failures, we are not allowing room for the fact that we are human.

Each and every one of us are human.

We try and sometimes we get it, and then other days we fail.

We fall flat.

We fall on our face.

It is what we do on those moments that will define who we are, and what we stand for.

I am okay with being a failure because it means I tried.

Trying is the key to life.

Trying means we got off the couch and moved. We put actions to our words. We walked it out.

I always find it so funny that people are afraid to cry. People say it is a sign of weakness. If that is the case, then I have one of the weakest dads in the world.

My dad is as hard working a man as you can imagine. He works two jobs. He is a general contractor and a pastor.

He injures himself on a regular basis, and repairs himself with superglue. He can build you anything you want, and he can pray for you while doing it.

Still, he cries at Hallmark commercials.

He cries at movies, when the good guy wins the day, and he cries when his favorite team wins.

He cries.

A lot.

And he fails.

He is not perfect.

He is not weak.

I want to be like my dad. I want to accept my failures, and work to overcome them. I want to look the obstacle in the face and figure out the way around it.

I also want to cry.

I want to know that I feel.

Failures are opportunities for us to turn the bad into the good. To take the sorrow of failure and turn it into the triumph of victory.

To find joy.

To find love.

To feel.

Failures are not the thing that holds us back, failures are the things that should push us forward into greatness.

Think of some of the best inventors, actors, teachers, musicians and artist. When they were given a task, how many of them failed the first time out?

How many failed the hundredth time?

What would have happened if they had given up?

I can tell you we wouldn’t have penicillin, the Sistine Chapel, Mozart and maybe even the vacuum, if they would’ve given up.

Failures have a way of bringing out our best, our most determined, and our most honest responses.

Failures are a part of life. Maybe not the best part, but they can lead to some of the best experiences this life has to offer.

Don’t fear the failure. Embrace the failure and embrace the idea that it is okay.

I have to rely on the fact that God sees me. He sees everything about me. Even my failures. And He loves me still.

“But it is not as though the word of God has failed.” Romans 9:6

Of all the failures in all of time, God’s word has not failed.

That is what we can rely on.

In the midst of all the failures, our own, other peoples, the worlds, governments, all of it, God’s words will not and can not fail.

It is not in His character to fail.

He is constant in and through our lives.

God remains constant.

Just like I talked about in Sovereign God, our God is always over all and through all.

When my failures hit me full on, in the face, I have to return to the only truth that has not failed me. To the truth that has stood the test of time, lives, and history.

God.

The truth that no matter how hard I fail, how big of a failure I feel like God sees me. He knows me. He loves me and He does not fail.

God does not fail.

He is faithful.

His faithfulness may not look like what we want but He is faithful.

That truth gets me through my moments of failures, the times where I think I have been left behind, and the longings for a future that I have yet to achieve are looming over me like a cloud, I have to remember that God sees me.
That my failures are not the end. That they are not this determining factor that makes God love me less.

Being okay with your failures is not accepting them as the final word, but learning to get up and try again. Learning that God holds all things, and that He never fails. We may not always do the right thing, but He always does.

If you are down, and you feel like you are out of the game, get up.

Dust yourself off and get back into the race.

You are not a failure.

You may have failed, but that does not make you a failure. In fact that only makes you a “trier”.

Walk tall, God is not through with you.

God does not know how to fail, and He is on your side.

Walk tall.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *